Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala  | Star #8996

Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala | Star #8996

Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala | Star #8996

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Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala, Star #8996, aged 66 years, was a 32 year, 8 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services – Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 710 – Gang Crimes Unit South and was a member of the Hostage, Barricade and Terrorist (HBT) Unit.

On July 14, 1988, at approximately 11:00 a.m., the Cook County Sheriff’s Office was in the process of serving an eviction notice. The respondent was a former Chicago Police Officer named Tommie Lee Hudson, age 46, at 7237 South Stony Island Avenue. The Sheriff’s Officers and the movers made a forced entry into the residence with a sledgehammer. Upon entry Hudson fired three shots at them with a shotgun from behind an archway in his living room, and one of the movers, Edgar Luna, age 27, was hit in the upper arm. The Officer’s immediately called for backup. Luna, the other movers and the deputies hid beneath the front porch until Chicago Police arrived.

Officer Domagala was on duty shortly before his shift was over. As a member of the HBT Team, he responded to the hostage / barricade situation. Responding officers surrounded the property. Officer Domagala was assigned to the rear containment behind a garage located east of the home, where he took up a defensive position. With the house surrounded, officers tried to communicate with Hudson with bullhorns because he had no phone. Hudson rarely responded to officers. Shortly before 5:00 p.m., Officer Domagala peeked around the corner of the garage looking towards the house approximately 100 feet away. As his head peeked around the corner a round shot round struck him in the head. Hudson had fired his replica of a Civil War cap-and-ball revolver from a rear kitchen window just as Officer Domagala peeked around the corner. The ball struck Officer Domagala in the forehead, passed through the right side of his brain, then came to rest near his right ear. He was transported to Michael Reese Hospital where he underwent six hours of surgery to remove the ball from his brain. In a statement made by Commander Richard Dwyer, of the 21st District – Prairie, Domagala was able to talk to paramedics on the way to the hospital and did not pass out until he was medicated. Edgar Luna was taken to Jackson Park Hospital and Medical Center was treated and released.

Following the shooting of Officer Domagala the HBT Team fired at least 50 tear gas canisters into the home and finally persuaded Hudson to come out. At 6:55 p.m., Hudson surrendered, came out waving a white flag, and was taken into custody without further incident. Several registered firearms, a cap-and-ball revolver, shotgun, two-shot .22 Magnum Derringer pistol and an air rifle were recovered from Hudson’s home. In addition a hunting bow and three homemade black powder bombs were also recovered.

Hudson was arrested and charged with attempted murder of a police officer. On December 10, 1990, minutes before a jury was to be picked for his trial, Hudson was declared incompetent to stand trial. Cook County Criminal Court Judge James Bailey ordered Hudson committed to the Illinois Department of Mental Health for up to a year for evaluation and treatment. Hudson was later released from the state hospital and eventually relocated to Memphis, TN and then to Houston, TX where he was killed on February 10, 1994. He is buried in West Tennessee State Veterans Cemetery located at 4000 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Memphis, Tennessee.

Hudson was a police officer from 1966 until February 15, 1971, when he resigned after a medical disability leave. Relatives of Hudson at the time said he had suffered from mental problems for years but they couldn`t get him help from authorities and gave up in frustration. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force during Vietnam but was never deployed and according to family. According to the Veterans Administration, Hudson bought his home, a two-story brick row house, with a VA insured mortgage but stopped paying in August, 1984. “The VA tried to help him keep his home, but it just became impossible to do,” said Art Selikoff, a spokesman for the VA. According to the Cook County Sheriff`s Office, the VA foreclosed on the home in 1985, and sheriff’s deputies evicted Hudson on October 15, 1986. In April, 1987, however, the VA complained in court that Hudson had moved back into the home.

Officer Domagala was 37 years old at the time of the incident, would enter the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) on October 12, 1989 and later resign from the Department on February 6, 2014. He survived the round shot but would suffer from years of traumatic brain injury complications, surgeries and therapies. Every day of his life continued to be a new challenge. For the past several years of his life Officer Domagala had been living in a traumatic brain injury rehabilitation center in Southern Illinois. Officer Domagala passed away on September 5, 2017 at Kindred Lakeshore Hospital in Edgewater, from complications resulting from his line of duty injury. On September 7, 2017, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office ruled his death a homicide.

Officer Domagala was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois. His funeral mass was held at Queen of Martyrs Church located at 10233 South Central Park, Evergreen Park, Illinois. He was laid to rest on September 11, 2017 in St. Casimir Cemetery, 4401 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Grave 2, Section 34, Lot 438.

Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala, born on February 6, 1951, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 18, 1981 and was in Recruit Class 81-3B at the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Blue Star Award, 1 Department Commendation, 1 Unit Meritorious Performance Award, 13 Honorable Mentions and 5 Complimentary Letters during his career. Officer Domagala was also an honoree for the Carter Harrison Medal in 1989.

Patrolman Domagala was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Denise K. and children: Adam, Craig and Erik. He was preceded in death by his parents.

One of the Sheriff’s Deputies that fateful day was John C. Knight. Knight would later join the Chicago Police Department on December 26, 1989. On January 9, 1999, Officer Knight was shot and killed in the line of duty while conducting a traffic stop.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Domagala’s star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis IV | Star #4103

Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis IV | Star #4103

Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis IV | Star #4103

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Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis, IV, Star #4103, aged 41 years, was an 8 year, 8 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District – Austin Tactical Unit.

On December 29, 2011, at approximately 8:30 p.m., Officer Clifton was fatally wounded during a robbery at the M&M Quick Foods store located at 1201 North Austin Boulevard. He was working an overtime security detail at the store, which had been robbed several weeks earlier, when Tyrone Clay, age 29, and Edgardo Colon, age 34, entered. The two men entered and announced a robbery. Officer Lewis drew his weapon and fired at the men. Colon returned fire and shot Officer Lewis multiple times in the abdomen and three times in the back before grabbing his service weapon and badge and fleeing the store. Clay took about $670.00 from the cash register before he fled the store. Officer Lewis was transported to Stroger Hospital of Cook County where he was pronounced dead at 9:08 p.m. on December 29, 2011.

Tyrone Clay and Edgardo Colon were later arrested and charged with 1st degree murder. They were ordered held without bond.

Officer Lewis was waked at United Missionary Baptist Church, his funeral mass was also held at United Missionary Baptist Church. He was laid to rest on January 5, 2012 in Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery, 18301 South Glenwood Thornton Road, Glenwood, Illinois.

Police Officer Lewis Pimpleton Clifton, IV, born May 5, 1970, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 28, 2003 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 4 Department Commendations, 1 Unit Meritorious Award, 70 Honorable Mentions, the 2009 Crime Reduction Award, the 2004 Crime Reduction Award and 2 Complimentary Letters during his career. Officer Lewis worked in the 8th District, 11th District and the 15th District.

Officer Lewis was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his fiancée, Tamara Latrice Tucker; daughter, Simone Gabrielle Lewis, age 11; parents: Clifton Pimpleton, III., age 64 and Maxine Malesha Hooks (nee Johnson), age 64 and sister, Nicole Olloway.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HT652264.

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Police Equine Mikey C. | Star #DNA

Police Equine Mikey C. | Star #DNA

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Police Equine Mikey C., aged 16 years, was an 8 year, 7 month veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Patrol – Patrol Group A, Special Functions Group: Unit 055 – Mounted Unit.

On August 29, 2011, at 2:00 p.m., Police Horse Mikey C. and his partner, Police Officer Paul Casasanto, were on patrol at North Avenue Beach. Suddenly and without warning Mikey C. became ill, reared and struggled. Officer Casasanto slid off Mikey C. and tried to calm him while people began to gather around. Officer Casasanto ordered them to “ Stay back,“ as Mikey C. continued to kick his hind legs. Mikey C., after several weakening attempts to stand, folded to the ground and rolled onto his side. When Police Horse Mikey C. laid his head on the pavement in defeat, Officer Casasanto placed one hand over his half-open eye as he took one last labored breath. Police Horse Mikey C., a chestnut thoroughbred, was an imposing 16.1 hands, or 65 inches from the shoulder. He was a retired racehorse, purchased by the city in January 2003. The diagnosis of his death was from a probable heart attack or aneurysm.

Police Horse Mikey C. was named in honor of Patrolman Michael Ceriale, who was killed in the line of duty while conducting undercover drug surveillance on August 21,1998. Mikey C. was one of 21 CPD horses named after fallen officers, a practice that began in 2001.

Police Equine Mikey C. received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 2003.

Police Horse Mikey C. was survived by his handler, Police Officer Paul Casasanto.

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Police Officer Paul Winston Nauden  | Star #10803

Police Officer Paul Winston Nauden | Star #10803

Police Officer Paul Winston Nauden | Star #10803

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Police Officer Paul Winston Nauden, Star #10803, aged 46 years, was a 21 year, 1 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to Bureau of Investigative Services – Organized Crime Division: Unit 189 – Narcotics and Gang Investigation Section.

On May 19, 2011, at 3:40 p.m., Officer Nauden was involved in an undercover narcotics investigation at 8000 South Crandon Avenue. During the investigation, he discreetly informed another undercover officer that he was not feeling well and he didn’t think he could make a buy. Officer Nauden withdrew himself in order not to jeopardize the safety of his fellow officers and the drug investigation in progress. He got into his vehicle and drove to and flagged down CFD Ambulance #50 at 7600 South Yates Avenue. He was then transported to the University of Chicago Hospital by CFD Ambulance #50. Officer Nauden was treated for a heart attack and was pronounced dead by Dr. Malyala at 6:15 a.m. on May 20, 2011. His cause of death was determined to be from acute myocardial infarction due to coronary arteriosclersois. The investigation Officer Nauden was involved in, yielded over a dozen arrests.

Officer Nauden was waked at A.R. Leak and Sons Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue. His funeral mass was held at the House of Hope located at 752 East 114th Street. He was laid to rest on May 27, 2011 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Officer Paul Winston Nauden, born December 5, 1964, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 26, 1990 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. His assignments included working in the 3rd District, and Unit 189. He earned 2 Department Commendations, 1 Police Officer of the Month Award, 1 Problem Solving Award, 1 Special Service Award, 18 Honorable Mentions, the 2009 Crime Reduction Award, the 2004 Crime Reduction Award, the Democratic National Convention Service Award and 3 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Nauden was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, April (nee Manuel) and children: Alana, age 2 and Avril, age 3.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HT303799.

On February 1, 2012, Officer Nauden’s star was retired by Superintendent Garry McCarthy and enshrined in the Superintendent’s Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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Patrolman Terrence J. Knox  | Star #2759

Patrolman Terrence J. Knox | Star #2759

Patrolman Terrence J. Knox | Star #2759

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Patrolman Terrence J. Knox, Star #2759, aged 63 years, was a 10 year, 0 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, from the 6th District – Gresham.

On March 7, 1969, Officer Knox was driving his squad car when he spotted a youth near Hirsch High school whom he suspected was a school-truant. Officer Knox exited his vehicle near 76th Street and Drexel Avenue and inquired as to why the youth, now known as Joseph Pannell, age 21 a U.S. Navy deserter and member of the Black Panthers, was not inside of the school. Pannell then opened fire on Officer Knox firing thirteen times. Officer Knox was struck four times by a 9mm bullet and survived the incident.

Joseph Pannell was arrested and jumped bond on May 10, 1971. In 1973, Officer Knox found and arrested Pannell again, the presiding judge set Pannell’s bond at $100,000, which he posted 10%. Pannell once again jumped bond on July 23, 1974 and fled the country to Canada. Pannell’s bond was forfeited and on September 24, 1974 Judge Raymond K. Berg awarded Officer Knox $9,000 from Pannell’s bond. The Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office later requested Judge Berg vacate his own ruling which awarded Knox the $9,000. Judge Berg denied their request.

Officer Knox resigned from the Department on March 1, 1978 as a result of his injuries and went on to become a successful businessman. He was hired by AT&T and was eventually promoted to Sales Director and retired in 2010.

In 2004, Knox asked Superintendent Phil Cline to reopen his case. The Department’s cold case squad was assigned to look into Knox’s case. Joseph Pannell was found living under the alias of Douglas Freeman in Toronto, Canada. Pannell was extradited to the United States. Officer Knox helped broker a plea deal which required Pannell, the now librarian, to serve 30 days in prison and donate $250,000 of his legal defense fund to the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation. Pannell who did not apologize to Officer Knox for attempting to murder him in 1969, addressed the court and said, “…It was an American tragedy. By this plea, I accept responsibility for the part I played in that tragedy.“ Joseph Pannell a.k.a. Douglas Freeman has since been expelled from Canada. He has been petitioning the Canadian Government to make an exception and ignore his criminal background and grant him re-entrance to Canada.

Officer Knox suffered permanent damage to his left arm in the incident and was left with limited use of his arm. Officer Knox would be forced onto the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) and spend the rest of his life suffering from illnesses caused by the blood transfusions required to save his life. While successful in private industry, Terrence Knox also made contributions to his former fellow officers. He never forgot. He joined causes to help officers wounded in the line of duty. He lobbied for legislation to make it harder for bail jumpers, like Pannell / Freeman to be released again. Officer Terrence Knox passed away on May 8, 2011, after a prolonged illness caused by blood transfusions.

Officer Knox’s funeral mass was held at Our Lady of the Woods Church. He was laid to rest on May 12, 2011 in Good Shepherd Cemetery, 16201 104th Avenue, Orland Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Terrence J. Knox, born June 25, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 26, 1968.

Patrolman Knox was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Diana; children: Christine (Martin) Gramlick and Charlene (Nathan) Livingston; siblings: Dennis Knox, Nancy Kermer and Thomas Knox and granddaughter, Evelyn. He was preceded in death by his parents.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #69H075389.

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